Event Title

Services thin on the ground: welcome to BC's north

Description

The restructuring of service delivery systems is a feature of British Columbia since the 1980s. This restructuring in rural and small town places exacerbates challenges already faced by residents and service providers. This paper examines the connections between the New Emerging Team for Health in Rural and Northern British Columbia (NETHRN-BC) (Hanlon & Halseth) and "Warmth of Welcome" projects (Nolin & Halseth). The purpose of the NETHRNBC project is to explore the social determinants of rural health. The UNBC component of this research examines formal and informal care networks for individuals and households under stress. Preliminary findings suggest that: (1) service reduction results from restructuring; (2) the voluntary structure in rural communities is unstable, and; (3) there is a growing reliance on partnerships within service provision.The "Warmth of Welcome" research project examines the immigration and settlement process, social and economic integration, and retention experiences of immigrants and refugees in northern British Columbia. Immigrant settlement patterns and experiences have implications for the delivery of employment, education, health, and other services. Settlement patterns in rural and small city regions are also important factors to consider because of limited services availability. Upon review of the key themes from the NETHRN-BC project for 2005 and 2006 and the "Warmth of Welcome" project, it is apparent that: (1) access to care services is difficult for northern residents; and (2) access to care services is exacerbated for new immigrants because of language, mobility, and lack of specific services.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

Subject - LCSH

Rural health services--British Columbia

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Session

Rural Geographies

Genre/Form

Abstracts

Type

event

Geographic Coverage

British Columbia;

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Keywords

British Columbia, service delivery, formal and informal

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

Services thin on the ground: welcome to BC's north

The restructuring of service delivery systems is a feature of British Columbia since the 1980s. This restructuring in rural and small town places exacerbates challenges already faced by residents and service providers. This paper examines the connections between the New Emerging Team for Health in Rural and Northern British Columbia (NETHRN-BC) (Hanlon & Halseth) and "Warmth of Welcome" projects (Nolin & Halseth). The purpose of the NETHRNBC project is to explore the social determinants of rural health. The UNBC component of this research examines formal and informal care networks for individuals and households under stress. Preliminary findings suggest that: (1) service reduction results from restructuring; (2) the voluntary structure in rural communities is unstable, and; (3) there is a growing reliance on partnerships within service provision.The "Warmth of Welcome" research project examines the immigration and settlement process, social and economic integration, and retention experiences of immigrants and refugees in northern British Columbia. Immigrant settlement patterns and experiences have implications for the delivery of employment, education, health, and other services. Settlement patterns in rural and small city regions are also important factors to consider because of limited services availability. Upon review of the key themes from the NETHRN-BC project for 2005 and 2006 and the "Warmth of Welcome" project, it is apparent that: (1) access to care services is difficult for northern residents; and (2) access to care services is exacerbated for new immigrants because of language, mobility, and lack of specific services.