Event Title

Predicting the riparian vegetation response to dam removal on the Elwha River floodplain

Description

The removal of Glines Canyon and Elwha dams on the Elwha River in Olympic National Park Washington State, scheduled for 2012, will be among the largest planned dam removals in the world. Their removal presents a range of challenges for the science of river restoration. One of the challenges will be to understand processes controlling revegetation and invasive species colonization upon sediments that are exposed by dam removal. It is not clear how the approximately 14 million cubic yards of sediment trapped behind these dams will be deposited in the floodplain, or how this sediment deposition will affect downstream riparian plant communities. To determine the trajectory of vegetation succession within the Elwha River Floodplain and the extent to which reservoir sediments will facilitate the colonization of invasive species, I propose an experiment which will simulate the deposition of lake sediments in downstream floodplains.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

8-3-2008 8:00 AM

Subject - LCSH

Riparian ecology--Washington (State)--Elwha River; Dam retirement--Environmental aspects--Washington (State)--Elwha River; Stream ecology--Washington (State)--Elwha River

End Date

8-3-2008 5:00 PM

Session

Poster Session

Genre/Form

Posters

Type

event

Geographic Coverage

Elwha River (Wash.)

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Keywords

dams, Elwha River, river restoration

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Mar 8th, 8:00 AM Mar 8th, 5:00 PM

Predicting the riparian vegetation response to dam removal on the Elwha River floodplain

The removal of Glines Canyon and Elwha dams on the Elwha River in Olympic National Park Washington State, scheduled for 2012, will be among the largest planned dam removals in the world. Their removal presents a range of challenges for the science of river restoration. One of the challenges will be to understand processes controlling revegetation and invasive species colonization upon sediments that are exposed by dam removal. It is not clear how the approximately 14 million cubic yards of sediment trapped behind these dams will be deposited in the floodplain, or how this sediment deposition will affect downstream riparian plant communities. To determine the trajectory of vegetation succession within the Elwha River Floodplain and the extent to which reservoir sediments will facilitate the colonization of invasive species, I propose an experiment which will simulate the deposition of lake sediments in downstream floodplains.