Senior Project Advisor

Dorsey-Palmateer, Reid

Document Type

Project

Publication Date

Spring 2019

Keywords

Energy Efficiency, Building Programs, Market Failures, Economics

Abstract

Energy efficiency is often times the most cost effective solution towards reducing energy demand. Energy usage in buildings accounts for upwards of 40% of the total energy consumption in the United States, as well as the vast majority of the growth in energy demand. Despite this buildings are often not built to be energy efficient, causing the residential and commercial sector to paying for hundreds of millions dollars on unnecessary energy use. The reason for this is the many market failures including: risk, lack of information, and access to capital. Looking at policies by the United States and China attempting to fix these market failures, it is found that most policies were at least cost effective in increasing energy efficiency. The most effective policy tended to be those intended to increase consumer information, possibly because of the supplementary effects in which previous information policies are retained in consumer minds and further information serves to create a more sophisticated knowledge base. It is also found that the major problem in almost all policies was full compliance, showing the need for additional enforcement.

Department

Economics

Subjects - Topical (LCSH)

Sustainable buildings--Economic aspects--United States; Sustainable buildings--Economic aspects--China

Geographic Coverage

United States; China

Genre/Form

student projects; term papers

Type

Text

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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