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Date Permissions Signed


Date of Award

Summer 2016

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)



First Advisor

Diehl, Peter D.

Second Advisor

Murphy, Sean Eisen

Third Advisor

Goldman, Tristan


The present study examines two historical texts; the History of the Normans by Dudo of St-Quentin and the Russian Primary Chronicle by the anonymous authors. Both sources have only recently been examined by historians, but have never been compared. These two sources created a historical narrative for the new Norman culture and Russian culture. Before these texts both of these cultures had been forming, but they had not been dedicated to pen and paper. The authors of these texts needed to justify the rule of the patron dynasties because they both originated from Scandinavian in the late ninth century and early tenth century. In addition to being foreign, the patriarchs of each dynasty were Norse pagan. The authors worked around these two problems by tying members of the dynasties to important Christian figures and using Christian redirect. Throughout this study I demonstrate that in addition to a shared Christian redirect, both authors used a shared Pan-Scandinavian oral tradition by comparing them to the Icelandic Sagas.




Western Washington University

OCLC Number


Digital Format


Subjects – Names (LCNAF)

Dudo, Dean of St. Quentin, active 1030; Rollo, Duke of Normandy, approximately 860-approximately 932;

Geographic Coverage

Normandy (France); Kievan Rus


Academic theses




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