Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-25-2001

Abstract

The Hawai'i Undersea Geo-Observatory (HUGO) is an ocean bottom observatory located on the summit of Lo'ihi seamount, Hawai'i. An electro-optical cable connects the HUGO junction box to a shore station on the Big Island of Hawaii, thereby enabling the first real-time monitoring of a submarine volcano. HUGO was active for 3 months in 1998, collecting nearly continuous, real-time data on a high-rate hydrophone. Signals detected during that time include local as well as teleseismic earthquakes, T phases from Pacific-wide earthquakes, landslides on the submarine flank of Kilauea, and eruption sounds from the current Kilauea eruption. The data do not indicate a Lo'ihi eruption during the time that HUGO was active. The variety and quality of signals detected by the HUGO hydrophone confirms that a real-time observatory can serve a valuable role in studies of oceanic acoustics, local and teleseismic earthquakes, and submarine eruption mechanics.

Publication Title

Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems

Volume

2

Issue

Paper number 2000GC000113

Required Publisher's Statement

Copyright 2001 American Geophysical Union

DOI: 10.1029/2000GC000113

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000GC000113/abstract

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