Research Mentor(s)

Mary Erickson

Affiliated Department

Media and Communication

Sort Order

15

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

The iconic image V-J Day in Times Square is nationally remembered for the celebration of the end of World War II. Focusing on the archival collection Victory and Peace from the National Archives, this research demonstrates a disconnect in American perceptions and the reality of culture through iconic images. Specifically I investigate the extent to which images from the 1940s are romanticized, celebrated and replicated in reflection of remembrance of the World War II era. These replications do not properly reflect the true events in 1945, but rather the idea that many would like to take away from this era. The images I refer to throughout this research regarding a sudden kiss contribute to this generation’s nostalgia that comes from World War II phenomena. The relevance that this paper has to this contemporary moment contributes to the ideas of sexism, dominant American culture and the freedom of expression.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Capturing the Moment: A Rhetorical Analysis of World War II Celebration

Media and Communication

The iconic image V-J Day in Times Square is nationally remembered for the celebration of the end of World War II. Focusing on the archival collection Victory and Peace from the National Archives, this research demonstrates a disconnect in American perceptions and the reality of culture through iconic images. Specifically I investigate the extent to which images from the 1940s are romanticized, celebrated and replicated in reflection of remembrance of the World War II era. These replications do not properly reflect the true events in 1945, but rather the idea that many would like to take away from this era. The images I refer to throughout this research regarding a sudden kiss contribute to this generation’s nostalgia that comes from World War II phenomena. The relevance that this paper has to this contemporary moment contributes to the ideas of sexism, dominant American culture and the freedom of expression.

 

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