Poster Title

Northwestern Salamander Site Selection for Egg Deposition

Research Mentor(s)

John McLaughlin

Affiliated Department

Environmental Sciences

Sort Order

45

Start Date

18-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2017 12:00 PM

Document Type

Event

Abstract

This project investigated Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) site selection for egg deposition. The Northwestern Salamander, among other amphibian species, is vulnerable to population declines due to habitat loss and degradation from increasing urbanization and climate change. Egg mass density provides an important measure of population abundance and reproductive success. Knowing the preferred site characteristics for egg deposition could be key to protecting Northwestern Salamanders from local population declines and extirpations. We measured egg mass density relative to four site characteristics: water depth, distance from shore, vegetation density, and water body area. During April 2017 we conducted perimeter searches of permanent ponds located in two low-elevation protected areas: Stimpson Nature Reserve and Chuckanut Community Forest. We evaluated relative importance of site characteristics using information theoretic methods applied to regression models. Our results provide information about Northwestern Salamander habitat use that can be applied to improve amphibian conservation efforts, including land and shoreline management.

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Northwestern Salamander Site Selection for Egg Deposition

Environmental Sciences

This project investigated Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) site selection for egg deposition. The Northwestern Salamander, among other amphibian species, is vulnerable to population declines due to habitat loss and degradation from increasing urbanization and climate change. Egg mass density provides an important measure of population abundance and reproductive success. Knowing the preferred site characteristics for egg deposition could be key to protecting Northwestern Salamanders from local population declines and extirpations. We measured egg mass density relative to four site characteristics: water depth, distance from shore, vegetation density, and water body area. During April 2017 we conducted perimeter searches of permanent ponds located in two low-elevation protected areas: Stimpson Nature Reserve and Chuckanut Community Forest. We evaluated relative importance of site characteristics using information theoretic methods applied to regression models. Our results provide information about Northwestern Salamander habitat use that can be applied to improve amphibian conservation efforts, including land and shoreline management.