Abstract Title

Session S-03G: Ecosystem Services and Impacts of Sediment for Salish Sea Recovery

Keywords

Shorelines

Start Date

30-4-2014 3:30 PM

End Date

30-4-2014 5:00 PM

Description

Sediment processes on the Fraser Delta, British Columbia, are being observed using a real time scientific ocean network maintained and operated by Ocean Networks Canada and the Geological Survey of Canada. The instruments have detected many features of sediment transport including plume settling characteristics, deposition rates, conditions for tidal resuspension and transport. This information would be useful for the understanding of remobilization and transport of contaminants from the Fraser River. Among the key findings, settling rates might be faster than stokes settling alone would account for, and annual bed-building deposition is interrupted by massive erosion events at certain tides. In addition to the transport modes above, the instruments have registered several turbidity current events, and in at least two cases these were strong enough to lift the 1-tonne platform off the seabed and send it tumbling, all the time measuring rarely measured properties of the turbidity currents. These turbidity currents would remove sediment and presumably contaminants to deep water in the Salish Sea (though we are not measuring contaminants directly). In this presentation, we show highlights of our measurements on the modes of sediment transport on the Fraser Delta.

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Apr 30th, 3:30 PM Apr 30th, 5:00 PM

Sediment processes on the Fraser Delta

Room 6E

Sediment processes on the Fraser Delta, British Columbia, are being observed using a real time scientific ocean network maintained and operated by Ocean Networks Canada and the Geological Survey of Canada. The instruments have detected many features of sediment transport including plume settling characteristics, deposition rates, conditions for tidal resuspension and transport. This information would be useful for the understanding of remobilization and transport of contaminants from the Fraser River. Among the key findings, settling rates might be faster than stokes settling alone would account for, and annual bed-building deposition is interrupted by massive erosion events at certain tides. In addition to the transport modes above, the instruments have registered several turbidity current events, and in at least two cases these were strong enough to lift the 1-tonne platform off the seabed and send it tumbling, all the time measuring rarely measured properties of the turbidity currents. These turbidity currents would remove sediment and presumably contaminants to deep water in the Salish Sea (though we are not measuring contaminants directly). In this presentation, we show highlights of our measurements on the modes of sediment transport on the Fraser Delta.