Event Title

Broken Spanish: The television audience and the struggle for language and identity

Streaming Media

Description

Historically, Spanish-language networks have been able to secure a point of difference by defining their audience as “Spanish-speaking”, but as US Latinos have become a cultural and economic force, mainstream networks have been motivated to establish upstart networks of their own. In this talk I explore how the entry of dominant mainstream players is re-defining the very concept of Hispanic television. Spanish-language networks have traditionally allowed for the possibility of alternative forms of cultural production but the entry of dominant mainstream players poses the risk of greater homogeneity within the marketplace and the reification of social hierarchies.

About the Lecturer: Christopher Chávez, Assistant Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, University of Oregon

Document Type

Event

Start Date

5-11-2014 12:00 PM

End Date

5-11-2014 1:00 PM

Location

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Resource Type

Moving image

Title of Series

World Issues Forum

Genre/Form

lectures

Contributing Repository

Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

Keywords

Spanish-language networks, Hispanic television, "Spanish-speaking"

Rights

This resources is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws.

Language

English

Format

video/mp4

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Nov 5th, 12:00 PM Nov 5th, 1:00 PM

Broken Spanish: The television audience and the struggle for language and identity

Fairhaven College Auditorium

Historically, Spanish-language networks have been able to secure a point of difference by defining their audience as “Spanish-speaking”, but as US Latinos have become a cultural and economic force, mainstream networks have been motivated to establish upstart networks of their own. In this talk I explore how the entry of dominant mainstream players is re-defining the very concept of Hispanic television. Spanish-language networks have traditionally allowed for the possibility of alternative forms of cultural production but the entry of dominant mainstream players poses the risk of greater homogeneity within the marketplace and the reification of social hierarchies.

About the Lecturer: Christopher Chávez, Assistant Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, University of Oregon