Research Mentor(s)

Ruth Sofield, Benjamin Maki

Description

Arsenic from anthropogenic sources and geological weathering is a contaminant of concern in sediment environments of Washington State. Legacy contamination can be attributed to extensive application of lead-arsenate pesticides and industrial smelting processes. Arsenic contamination of sediment provides an exposure pathway into groundwater and can potentially contaminate drinking water. Metal bioavailability of contaminated sediment is greatly influenced by the presence of acid volatile sulfides and organic carbon. Activated carbon (AC) has been shown to be an effective in-situ treatment for decreasing bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediment. Less is known about the applicability of AC to decrease metal mobility in the sediment environment.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

19-5-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

19-5-2016 3:00 PM

Location

Environmental Sciences

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this documentation for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author's written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Keywords

enic, sediment, activated carbon, sorption

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May 19th, 12:00 PM May 19th, 3:00 PM

Kinetic and equilibrium sorption modeling of arsenite and arsenate onto Lake Whatcom sediments and activated carbon.

Environmental Sciences

Arsenic from anthropogenic sources and geological weathering is a contaminant of concern in sediment environments of Washington State. Legacy contamination can be attributed to extensive application of lead-arsenate pesticides and industrial smelting processes. Arsenic contamination of sediment provides an exposure pathway into groundwater and can potentially contaminate drinking water. Metal bioavailability of contaminated sediment is greatly influenced by the presence of acid volatile sulfides and organic carbon. Activated carbon (AC) has been shown to be an effective in-situ treatment for decreasing bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediment. Less is known about the applicability of AC to decrease metal mobility in the sediment environment.

 

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