Event Title

Selective Modification of Silk-Film Surfaces

Research Mentor(s)

Amanda Murphy

Description

Silk-conducting polymer (silk-CP) composites are flexible, conducting materials that are biocompatible and show promise for biomedical applications. In the past, the necessary modification reactions to silk films that create the silk-CP composites have unselectively modified the entire silk structure. We have recently created a method for selectively patterning silk surfaces with conducting polymer using a photolithographic process to “mask” off sections of silk films, which allows selective and precise patterning of features down to 40 μm. This process is highly versatile and can be used to rapidly prototype and create flat, conducting pathways. Here we present attempts at utilizing this technique in the production of a few basic biomedical devices such as a strain gauge and explore the usefulness of this technique in enabling selectivity in any silk-modifying surface reaction.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2018

End Date

May 2018

Location

Chemistry

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 17th, 12:00 PM May 17th, 3:00 PM

Selective Modification of Silk-Film Surfaces

Chemistry

Silk-conducting polymer (silk-CP) composites are flexible, conducting materials that are biocompatible and show promise for biomedical applications. In the past, the necessary modification reactions to silk films that create the silk-CP composites have unselectively modified the entire silk structure. We have recently created a method for selectively patterning silk surfaces with conducting polymer using a photolithographic process to “mask” off sections of silk films, which allows selective and precise patterning of features down to 40 μm. This process is highly versatile and can be used to rapidly prototype and create flat, conducting pathways. Here we present attempts at utilizing this technique in the production of a few basic biomedical devices such as a strain gauge and explore the usefulness of this technique in enabling selectivity in any silk-modifying surface reaction.