Event Title

The phenology of flowering in Zostera marina varies in the Southern Salish Sea

Co-Author(s)

Wood, Skylar; Donoghue, Cinde; Yang, Sylvia

Research Mentor(s)

Heinicke, Samantha

Description

Restoration of eelgrass (Zostera marina) using seeds has been successful along the Atlantic Coast (USA), but little is known about sexual reproduction of eelgrass in Puget Sound. Therefore, this study investigates the variation of demographic parameters relating to sexual reproduction that could be used to optimize harvest of flowering shoots for seeds. To observe site-specific development of flowering shoots, we conducted a field survey at six locations spanning the Puget Sound (Cherry Point, Padilla Bay, Ship Harbor, Fidalgo Bay, Indianola, Dumas Bay), with repeated censuses from late June to early August of 2018. We quantified flowering and vegetative shoot density and collected flowering shoots to determine developmental stage and enumerated seeds. We found that flowering shoot prevalence and developmental stage varied over time and from site to site. Furthermore, flowering shoot length varied by site and was correlated with a greater number of seeds per shoot. The timing of flowering shoot development was also site-specific, with seeds from Padilla and Dumas Bays developing earliest. The flowering shoots from Padilla Bay collected in late June produced the highest yield of seeds after a period of ripening in flow-through tanks. These results imply that flowering density, together with longer and more developed flowering shoots result in a higher seed yield. Causal factors leading to variability in phenology deserves further study. Currently, the variation in viability and germination of the harvested seeds is being studied.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Environmental Science

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Subjects – Topical (LCSH)

Zostera marina--Washington (State)--Puget Sound--Phenology; Zostera marina--Washington (State)--Puget Sound--Reproduction

Geographic Coverage

Puget Sound (Wash.)

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

The phenology of flowering in Zostera marina varies in the Southern Salish Sea

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Restoration of eelgrass (Zostera marina) using seeds has been successful along the Atlantic Coast (USA), but little is known about sexual reproduction of eelgrass in Puget Sound. Therefore, this study investigates the variation of demographic parameters relating to sexual reproduction that could be used to optimize harvest of flowering shoots for seeds. To observe site-specific development of flowering shoots, we conducted a field survey at six locations spanning the Puget Sound (Cherry Point, Padilla Bay, Ship Harbor, Fidalgo Bay, Indianola, Dumas Bay), with repeated censuses from late June to early August of 2018. We quantified flowering and vegetative shoot density and collected flowering shoots to determine developmental stage and enumerated seeds. We found that flowering shoot prevalence and developmental stage varied over time and from site to site. Furthermore, flowering shoot length varied by site and was correlated with a greater number of seeds per shoot. The timing of flowering shoot development was also site-specific, with seeds from Padilla and Dumas Bays developing earliest. The flowering shoots from Padilla Bay collected in late June produced the highest yield of seeds after a period of ripening in flow-through tanks. These results imply that flowering density, together with longer and more developed flowering shoots result in a higher seed yield. Causal factors leading to variability in phenology deserves further study. Currently, the variation in viability and germination of the harvested seeds is being studied.