Event Title

A study of the ABC flowering genes in Passiflora caerulea

Co-Author(s)

Logan Day

Research Mentor(s)

Sandra Schulze

Description

The ABC genes of flowering development are conserved well enough across species to be used as a reference for studying flowering plants with incompletely sequenced genomes. Using the known sequences of the ABC genes in model plants, we set out to investigated the organization of these genes within the genus Passiflora. This genus consists of some 500 species distributed largely in the Americas, including a variety of colorful and fruiting variants of importance in both agriculture and the horticultural trade. While passionflowers are largely tropical plants, some species can survive as far north as Southern Canada; for example, the species P. caerulea demonstrates considerable hardiness. The wide array of colors, shapes, and arrangements found within the reproductive structures of passionflowers make them useful for studying flower development. While most Passiflora genome sequences are incomplete at this time, many databases do contain raw sequence data from a number of common species, including P. caerulea. We compiled unassembled sequence information from P. caerulea for the ABC coding sequences. By using bioinformatic analysis to compare known ABC sequences to the ABC sequences of the target species, we were able to make inferences about the structure and organization of the P. caerulea ABC genes. In order to support our analysis, we have designed PCR primers to target these genes and amplify the coding sequences from total RNA and genomic DNA which have extracted from the tissue of a P. caerulea plant clone. We present data in this poster summarizing the structure of members of the ABC developmental gene family in P. caerulea.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

15-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

15-5-2019 5:00 PM

Location

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

Department

Biology

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 15th, 5:00 PM

A study of the ABC flowering genes in Passiflora caerulea

Carver Gym (Bellingham, Wash.)

The ABC genes of flowering development are conserved well enough across species to be used as a reference for studying flowering plants with incompletely sequenced genomes. Using the known sequences of the ABC genes in model plants, we set out to investigated the organization of these genes within the genus Passiflora. This genus consists of some 500 species distributed largely in the Americas, including a variety of colorful and fruiting variants of importance in both agriculture and the horticultural trade. While passionflowers are largely tropical plants, some species can survive as far north as Southern Canada; for example, the species P. caerulea demonstrates considerable hardiness. The wide array of colors, shapes, and arrangements found within the reproductive structures of passionflowers make them useful for studying flower development. While most Passiflora genome sequences are incomplete at this time, many databases do contain raw sequence data from a number of common species, including P. caerulea. We compiled unassembled sequence information from P. caerulea for the ABC coding sequences. By using bioinformatic analysis to compare known ABC sequences to the ABC sequences of the target species, we were able to make inferences about the structure and organization of the P. caerulea ABC genes. In order to support our analysis, we have designed PCR primers to target these genes and amplify the coding sequences from total RNA and genomic DNA which have extracted from the tissue of a P. caerulea plant clone. We present data in this poster summarizing the structure of members of the ABC developmental gene family in P. caerulea.