Event Title

From the inside out: How the Golgi drives ciliary Ca2+ signaling

Co-Author(s)

Aliki Valdes, Tulip O'Neill

Research Mentor(s)

Galati, Nick

Description

Cilia are cellular projections that receive signals from the outside of the cell. Calcium ions (Ca2+) are necessary for cilia to receive signals, yet little is known about how Ca2+ levels are maintained within cilia (i.e., ciliary Ca2+ levels). The current “outside-in” model suggests that Ca2+ channels fill cilia with Ca2+ from outside of the cell (i.e., extracellular; Delling et al. 2016). However, the base of the cilium can be embedded within the Golgi apparatus, which is a rich source of intracellular Ca2+. Since the Golgi controls Ca2+ levels at other cellular structures (Follit et al. 2006; Micaroni et al. 2012), this raises the question – does the Golgi impact ciliary Ca2+ levels from inside the cell? The answer to this question is what I propose to be the new “inside-out” model of ciliary Ca2+ control.

Document Type

Event

Start Date

May 2020

End Date

May 2020

Department

Biology

Genre/Form

student projects, posters

Type

Image

Rights

Copying of this document in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this document for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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COinS
 
May 18th, 9:00 AM May 22nd, 5:00 PM

From the inside out: How the Golgi drives ciliary Ca2+ signaling

Cilia are cellular projections that receive signals from the outside of the cell. Calcium ions (Ca2+) are necessary for cilia to receive signals, yet little is known about how Ca2+ levels are maintained within cilia (i.e., ciliary Ca2+ levels). The current “outside-in” model suggests that Ca2+ channels fill cilia with Ca2+ from outside of the cell (i.e., extracellular; Delling et al. 2016). However, the base of the cilium can be embedded within the Golgi apparatus, which is a rich source of intracellular Ca2+. Since the Golgi controls Ca2+ levels at other cellular structures (Follit et al. 2006; Micaroni et al. 2012), this raises the question – does the Golgi impact ciliary Ca2+ levels from inside the cell? The answer to this question is what I propose to be the new “inside-out” model of ciliary Ca2+ control.