Presentation Abstract

Climate change is a pressing environmental concern, and understanding how abiotic variation contributes to population dynamics and persistence may ultimately predict the fates of species. Ocean acidification negatively impacts a range of species, including those using calcium carbonate for shell formation such as shellfish, which are important as ecosystem engineers and for food security. While much is known about carbonate chemistry and impacts of ocean acidification on the U.S. Pacific coast, there is limited regional information in British Columbia (BC), especially in socio-economically important coastal zones for aquaculture and migrating fisheries populations. Laboratory experimentation mimicking future climate scenarios provide valuable information on biological impacts under controlled conditions, but do not take into account the natural environmental fluctuations of coastal environments that may influence population persistence. This research program combines lower trophic level monitoring (plankton analysis), physiological responses (functional genomics of commercial bivalves) and high speed near real-time oceanographic monitoring at a field site in the northern Salish Sea, to provide information on system variability and its biological impacts on coastal ecosystems. Site abiotic variability will be discussed in the context of pre-industrial to current condition effects on species. Shellfish gene expression data will focus on population plasticity or microevolutionary adaptation to seasonal, optimal and sub-optimal calcium carbonate conditions over the short and long-term.

Session Title

Ocean Acidification: Observations and Monitoring in Salish Sea Waters

Keywords

Ocean acidification, Shellfish, Physiology

Conference Track

SSE5: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, and Research

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE5-218

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:15 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:15 AM Apr 5th, 11:30 AM

The story so far: an in situ pairing of chemical oceanography and physiology

Climate change is a pressing environmental concern, and understanding how abiotic variation contributes to population dynamics and persistence may ultimately predict the fates of species. Ocean acidification negatively impacts a range of species, including those using calcium carbonate for shell formation such as shellfish, which are important as ecosystem engineers and for food security. While much is known about carbonate chemistry and impacts of ocean acidification on the U.S. Pacific coast, there is limited regional information in British Columbia (BC), especially in socio-economically important coastal zones for aquaculture and migrating fisheries populations. Laboratory experimentation mimicking future climate scenarios provide valuable information on biological impacts under controlled conditions, but do not take into account the natural environmental fluctuations of coastal environments that may influence population persistence. This research program combines lower trophic level monitoring (plankton analysis), physiological responses (functional genomics of commercial bivalves) and high speed near real-time oceanographic monitoring at a field site in the northern Salish Sea, to provide information on system variability and its biological impacts on coastal ecosystems. Site abiotic variability will be discussed in the context of pre-industrial to current condition effects on species. Shellfish gene expression data will focus on population plasticity or microevolutionary adaptation to seasonal, optimal and sub-optimal calcium carbonate conditions over the short and long-term.