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Date Permissions Signed

5-16-2018

Date of Award

Fall 1983

Document Type

Masters Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Geology

First Advisor

Easterbrook, Don J., 1935-

Second Advisor

Beck, Myrl E.

Third Advisor

Suczek, Christopher A., 1942-2014

Abstract

Fossil diatom occurrence and anistropy of magnetic susceptibility are evaluated for their usefulness in differentiating glaclomarlne drift from till.

Fossil diatoms in Everson glaciomarine drift occur abundantly enough to be of paleoenvironmental significance only in association with in situ Serpula vermlcularia (Linne). Diatoms are generally a poor discriminator between till and glaciomarine drift. Paleoecological data suggest that, berg ice in marine water was the dominant agent of transportation for clastic particlesin Everson glaciomarine drift.

Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility investigations generated a characteristic magnetic signature for each diamicton, demonstrating intrinsic differences in the petrofabrics of the two sediment types.

Type

Text

Keywords

Glaciomarine drift, fossil diatoms

Publisher

Western Washington University

OCLC Number

1041192488

Digital Format

application/pdf

Geographic Coverage

Washington (State)

Genre/Form

masters theses

Language

English

Rights

Copying of this thesis in whole or in part is allowable only for scholarly purposes. It is understood, however, that any copying or publication of this thesis for commercial purposes, or for financial gain, shall not be allowed without the author’s written permission.

Included in

Geology Commons

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