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Welcome to the Journal of Educational Controversy — an interdisciplinary electronic journal of ideas. The purpose of this peer reviewed journal is to provide a national and international forum for examining the dilemmas and controversies that arise in teaching and learning in a pluralistic, democratic society.

JEC has been published since 2006 and we have recently transferred previously published issues to Western CEDAR. Look for the newest issue to be published in CEDAR, Fall, 2015.

Upcoming 10th Year Anniversary Issue

CALL FOR PAPERS - VOLUME 10 NUMBER 1
Use "Submit Article" button to the left.

MANUSCRIPTS DUE: JANUARY 1, 2015
PUBLICATION DATE: FALL 2015/WINTER 2016
THEME: OPEN (DEFINE YOUR OWN CONTROVERSY)

Current Issue: Volume 9, Number 1 (2015) Challenging the Deficit Model and the Pathologizing of Children: Envisioning Alternative Models

EDITOR’S PREVIEW AND GUIDE TO THIS ISSUE

IN ADDITION TO ARTICLES IN RESPONSE TO THE CONTROVERSY, WE HAVE TWO SPECIAL SECTIONS BELOW:

PREVIEW OF SPECIAL SECTION 1

Theme: THE PROSPECT EXPERIENCE: A STRENGTH-BASED ALTERNATIVE AND ITS LEGACY

Two examples of the Prospect Descriptive Process: (from the Volume 5, Number 1 issue of the Journal of Educational Controversy)

Link to the Prospect Archive of Children’s Work housed at the University of Vermont, Center for Digital Initiatives

See additional articles below under Special Section 1: THEME: THE PROSPECT EXPERIENCE: A STRENGTH-BASED ALTERNATIVE AND ITS LEGACY
 
PREVIEW OF SPECIAL SECTION 2
THEME: UPCOMING FORUM, PREVIEW OF THE FORUM'S UPCOMING DISCUSSION

In addition to the article below, readers can now view a video of the forum on our Public Forums Link on the menu.


SUPPLEMENT TO THE FILM REVIEW BELOW:
TRAILER FOR FILM

 

Read Rachel Severson's review of Schools Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten (Bullfrog Films) below in the Film Review section

School's Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten (Trailer) from Lisa Molomot on Vimeo.

Shown with permission of Bullfrog Films.

Editorial

Articles in Response to Controversy

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Breaking the Mold: Thinking Beyond Deficits
Elyse Hambacher and Winston C. Thompson
Vol. 9, Iss. 1

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Precarity and Pedagogical Responsibility
Ann Chinnery
Vol. 9, Iss. 1

Special Sections

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To Patricia F. Carini: A Dedication
Susan Donnelly
Vol. 9, Iss. 1


Theme: THE PROSPECT EXPERIENCE: A STRENGTH-BASED ALTERNATIVE AND ITS LEGACY

PDF

Resisting the “Single Story”
Ellen Schwartz
Vol. 9, Iss. 1


Theme: THE PROSPECT EXPERIENCE: A STRENGTH-BASED ALTERNATIVE AND ITS LEGACY

PDF

“Everyone Should Feel so Connected and Safe”: Using Parent Action Teams to Reach all Families
John Korsmo, Miguel Camarena, Andrea Clancy, Ann Eco, Bill Nutting, Basilia Quiroz, Azucena Ramirez, Veronica Villa-Mondragon, Stacy Youngquist, and Anne Jones
Vol. 9, Iss. 1


Theme: UPCOMING FORUM, PREVIEW OF THE FORUM'S UPCOMING DISCUSSION

Book Reviews

Film Review

About the Authors

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About the Authors

Vol. 9, Iss. 1

CONTROVERSY ADDRESSED IN THIS ISSUE:
Martin Seligman, founder of the field of positive psychology, has said that, “Modern psychology has been co-opted by the disease model. We've become too preoccupied with repairing damage when our focus should be on building strength and resilience, especially in children.” Is this also true of modern education? Political and pedagogical responses, from the “War on Poverty” through “No Child Left Behind” to address the educational gaps in academic achievement of historically marginalized and neglected groups (the poor, minorities and children with disabilities), were often deeply rooted in a language of cultural deprivation and special needs. Has this deficit model begun to surreptitiously creep into our educational discourse for all children? Have we become too focused on needs and deficiencies and forgotten that children also have capacities and strengths? Does the current emphasis on accountability and standardized testing contribute to the pathologizing of children? We invite authors to respond critically to this argument, envision alternative models, examine historical causes and precedents, analyze political and social ramifications, and share real life stories on the influence these ways of thinking have on the classroom and on the learning as experienced by students.

UPCOMING FORUM

Building on the Strengths of Families and Communities
The 17th Annual Educational Law and Social Justice Forum

Western Washington University
Wednesday, May 6, 2015

See a preview of the Forum's upcoming discussion under Special Section

A video of the forum is now on our Public Forums link.